How to correct crossover toe, keep patients active

November 26, 2017  |   Dr. Stych's Blog   |     |   0 Comment

sweet-ice-cream-photography-88754Crossover toe is a common foot problem that can inhibit physical activity for active adults, but conservative treatment can slow down the progressive deformity, or outpatient surgery can correct the deformity and keep people active and on their feet.

Individuals with hammertoes, bunions or a second toe that extends beyond the big toe are most susceptible to developing crossover toe as they age.  It’s a common problem among people in which the second toe gradually moves across the big toe.  It can be painful and, therefore, difficult to walk comfortably or pursue an active lifestyle.

The first symptom of crossover toe is pain in the ball of the foot. A tear in the joint makes the second toe unstable. It falls out of alignment and eventually drifts.

We normally check the ball of the foot for a possible plantar-plate tear when a patient complains of pain in the area. Pre-existing forefoot problems combined with normal wear and tear or possible trauma can cause the plate to tear over time.  Non-surgical treatments include a toe splint, anti-inflammatory medication, physical therapy, and foot orthotics.

If the pain persists and the toe starts to drift, surgery is recommended to suture the plantar plate or replace it through a ligament or tendon transfer.  Surgery to correct crossover toe is an outpatient procedure performed with local anesthesia and IV sedation. Patients with bunions or hammertoes are advised to have those deformities corrected during the surgery. Recovery time is about six weeks.

If your foot hurts, you aren’t exercising, and then your cardiovascular health is compromised.

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    November 26, 2017

    Crossover toe is a common foot problem that can inhibit physical activity for active adults, but conservative treatment can slow down the progressive deformity, or outpatient surgery can correct the deformity and keep people active and on their feet. Individuals with hammertoes, bunions or a second toe that extends beyond the big toe are most […]