A message from Dr. Stych:

Traverse City's Family Podiatrist

I value the individuality and diversity of my patients, and enjoy the opportunity of getting to know each and every one. I have a wealth of experience working with a variety of patient populations, including children, adults, seniors, people with acute foot issues, and those managing chronic diseases. The therapeutic goal for my patient is always foot comfort. My more personal goal is to help my patient maintain the best possible quality of life.

I am highly qualified to treat all foot and ankle disorders and particularly enjoy treating bunion deformities, complex diabetic foot conditions, Achilles tendon disorders, lower extremity skin & nail problems, flatfoot, and pediatric foot conditions.

Thank you for coming to us and allowing us to help you!


Heel Pain and Plantar Fasciitis
Heel pain is most often caused by plantar fasciitis, a condition that is sometimes also called heel spur syndrome when ...


 

Protect Your Feet From Skin Cancer
Skin cancer on your feet? Yes, it definitely does occur. In fact, melanoma of the foot is particularly fatal ...


Dr. Stych's Blog

  • COVID-19 & Podiatry
    March 24, 2020

    All patients and healthcare providers lives have significantly changed since the recent outbreak of COVID-19 in the United States. We have had to take extreme measures to do our part in helping mitigate the spread of the virus, such as screening questions prior to appointments and rescheduling non-essential appointments. At the same time, there is […]

  • Blood Clots – A Silent Killer
    April 21, 2019

    What is a Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)? A DVT is a venous thromboembolism (VTE) in one of the deep veins in the human body. The terms DVT and VTE are often used interchangeably. In layman’s terms, a DVT or VTE is called a “blood clot”. Blood clots stick to the wall on the inside of […]

  • Charcot Foot
    November 26, 2018

    What is a Charcot Foot? A Charcot [shar-koh] foot, sometimes called Charcot joint, is a complex syndrome characterized as a foot with multiple fractures and joint dislocations in a patient with neuropathy (loss of sensation) and a history of minimal or no known trauma. It is named after Dr. Jean-Martin Charcot, a 19th century French […]